Comprehensive Approach Needed for Success

GLOBE-Net (June 11, 2009) - How does a company in a small city become a global player in the high-tech industry? It's not easy; and it doesn't happen overnight. It takes holistic strategic thinking and a worldwide vision - two things that have been at the core of Carmanah Technologies Corporation since its founding in 1996. Carmanah Technologies is currently the largest supplier of solar power systems and solar-LED lighting in Canada.
Read More

Solar area lighting: a bright idea for illuminating ports

Port authorities are continually faced with the challenge of balancing environmentally sustainable, economically viable, and socially responsible operations. As environmental protection moves to the forefront of concerns in today's world, the need to incorporate renewable energy alternatives into daily operations becomes ever more imperative.
Read More

Carmanah CEO sees brighter times for solar demand

OTTAWA (Reuters) - The recession will end, the chief executive of Canadian solar equipment maker Carmanah Technologies Corp likes to say, and the bright light at the end of the tunnel is solar powered. But the timing of that recovery remains murky, and customers are delaying orders for the solar lights, solar power and solar grid-tie systems Carmanah makes for industrial use. "Customers are being very cautious, so nobody has canceled any orders and they have not told us they won't be ordering," CEO Ted Lattimore said in an interview. "As they get their own financial gardens in a row...they're being very careful with when they actually make a purchase.
Read More

LED Complete: A New Standard for Lighted Aids

As Coast Guard Aids to Navigation units work toward completing the transition from incandescent lanterns to the newer LED lights, USCGC FIR offers some observations from the past years of its own transition. FIR recently completed the transition to LED lanterns on all of its lighted aids in the Pacific Northwest.
Read More

Ecuador Eliminating Fossil Fuel Use in the Galapagos

The Galapagos Islands rank right up there with the Amazon and the Serengeti as one of the richest and best known, yet fragile and threatened, ecosystems in the world. Now, the Ecuadoran government is looking to a range of alternative energy resources to make sure it stays that way. Recognized by the UN as a World Heritage Site for its rare and unique marine and terrestrial fauna and flora, booming eco-tourism in the Galapagos, ironically, has added to the challenges and problems faced by those looking to restore and protect the island's native species and ecological balance. The Ecuadoran government has turned to wind and solar power as a means of realizing its goals.
Read More

Going for green without the red ink

Clean-tech companies need a solid business case
Read More

Power Up with Solar

In our increasingly connected world, we depend on specialized monitoring and communications technology to help manage industrial assets, facilitate efficient transportation systems and maintain contact across vast distances. Every day, advanced flow and condition sensors monitor thousands of miles of oil and gas pipelines, intelligent transportation systems (ITS) guide traffic through busy roadways, and microwave relays and repeaters extend the range and effectiveness of vital communications networks throughout remote regions and challenging environments.
Read More

Solar panels installed at Oak Bay High to offset power for two physics labs

Students at Oak Bay High have turned textbook learning into reality. Emerging from a Grade 9 science project on alternative energy forms, a group of students launched a campaign one year ago to fundraise money for solar panels at the school. They have since reached their $16,000 target and this week 10 solar panels are being mounted across the east building roof. "There were lots of setbacks along the way so it's really nice to come through it all and know you've accomplished something," said Grade 11 student and project co-ordinator Sonora Godfrey.
Read More

Bay Street: Patience needed to harvest gold from green

OTTAWA, March 15 (Reuters) - It will take more than government incentive plans and bargain prices for stocks in Canada's green energy sector to flourish, and investors will need patience if they are to hit pay dirt. While the long-term outlook for companies working with solar, wind and water power is promising, the business now is being buffeted by the recession, a credit crunch and tumbling fuel prices. What's more, critics say a federal stimulus plan is too stingy and fails to renew a wildly popular program to spark clean energy production. For a sector heavy with cash-hungry junior and mid-tier companies, crumbling stock valuations serve a further blow, cutting off a source of project funding. "All these beaten-up renewable, publicly traded companies are amazing value right now.
Read More

Carmanah posts $1.3-million profit; Solar lighting producer has shed assets and cut staff

Calling itself a lean company with plenty of cash, no debt and a "bright light" going forward, Carmanah Technologies Corp. has reported a $1.3- million profit on revenues of $60.6 million for 2008. The solar marine and aviation light producer shed non-core business units, trimmed staff and outsourced its manufacturing and is now on a profitable footing, chief executive Ted Lattimore said yesterday. "We know where we're going and have the technology and lean infrastructure to get us there, Lattimore said in a statement. "Even during a recession, security and safety remain paramount ...
Read More